Da Vinci – Il Genio, PART II

The Mona Lisa

Italian: La Gioconda, French: La Joconde

The Mona Lisa (c.1503–1517 ) by Leonardo da Vinci. Oil on poplar 77 cm x 53 cm
The Mona Lisa (c.1503–1517 ) by Leonardo da Vinci.
Oil on poplar
77 cm x 53 cm

The half-length portrait of a woman—thought to be a portrait of Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Francesco del Giocondo—now lays on permanent display at The Louvre museum in Paris and is the official property of the French Republic. The lady of mystery, wonder and beauty Mona Lisa is who I met last at the Da Vinci – The Genius exhibition. She is the highlight of the entire exhibition together with the revealing of the 25 secrets about her creation.

Thanks to Pascal Cotte and his self-invented 240 megapixel multispectral camera, we were able to see the exquisite feature of the Mona Lisa painting as it was before its damage and before its original colors faded away with time. I found out a few things about La Gioconda. Did you know that the feminine mystique had been stolen years ago? She was stolen for about two years before the real thief was discovered and at the time it was believed that she was lost forever. The Louvre employee Vincenzo Peruggia had stolen it by entering the building during regular hours, hiding in a broom closet and walking out with it hidden under his coat after the museum had closed. Peruggia believed that the painting should be returned to Italy for display in an Italian museum.                                                            Other than that I found it interesting how Mona Lisa had no eyebrows or eyelashes. Rumor has it that Mona Lisa was a man or rather the self-portrait of Leonardo dressed as a woman. Although Cotte attempted to bring us insight into the making of the artwork there are still so many unanswered questions. The painting still remains an enigma to this day. I guess that is where her beauty lies-in her mystery.

 

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Author: The Grubby Eater

just a basic girl who loves food..

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